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How Lemonade Focuses on Value to Customers

Here is the short version of my analysis of the way Lemonade has focused their offer on the things that will motivate customers to buy:

  1. "Forget everything you know about insurance"

    That's a promise to be different, cleverly playing on the low trust environment for insurance. It is a gamble, and must be backed up by what  follows. Lemonade can only get away with it, because they do back it up.
  2. "Instant Everything"

    Their tech means that you can get cover in 90 seconds and get claims paid in three minutes. If you want a benchmark for product development, you have it right there. Beat those two numbers and you have a winner. Why? Because life is short and apart from a few sad individuals (like me) no-one is so interested in insurance that they want to fill in a 2, 12, or 22-page form. No one really wants to read a 2, 12, or 150-page policy document. Consumers are just not that into us. Making everything "instant" is also a testable proposition. It's almost a dare: we bet we can move your insurance fast. The consumer can see if its true - but only by starting. When was the last time you heard an insurer bragging about how quick they do things?

  3. "Killer prices".

    This is a testable proposition as well. Most consumers can spot the lower number out of two. Price can be a curse, of course, but right now Lemonade is bound to lose money, so you might as well lose it with more clients than with less. The consumer is up for this too, surprisingly. The unfair advantage of the upstart? Sure, but Lemonade is also betting that by automating everything the marginal costs of acquiring a customer can be kept very low, well beyond the start-up phase. In fact they reckon they are one tenth of the industry average.

  4. "Big heart".

    In a cause-motivated era the model of Lemonade, which states that after their share (20% of the premium) the surplus will go to charity. Warm-fuzzy emotional buyers can love the connection with their self-image. Cold-hard rational buyers can feel comfortable that the company does not have a limitless incentive to deny claims. It works both ways. Hidden in here is a promise about product, but it isn't presented in a technical way.

How successful are they? Very, but it is early. Like a lot of start-ups Lemonade is keen on rapid customer acquisition, and doesn't need to worry so much about profits right now. Its current customer base is obviously too small to support its infrastructure, so detailed financial analysis cannot reveal much at this early stage. Of course, some day, it will need to achieve profit, some day it will be judged on the same metrics as other insurers. But insurers choosing to comfort themselves with that line, and putting their own digital transformation on the same timescale - 'we'll do that some-day' should reflect that Amazon is over 20 years old, has intentionally tiny profits, distributes no dividend, and remains a decidedly different company to all the others. Amazon thinks of itself as a 'day-one' company, and intentionally works on a strategy of avoiding 'some-day'. Amazon are also interested in the insurance market. For New Zealand insurers today, with companies like Lemonade choosing to start in New York, rather than Auckland, you have a precious window in which to change. Lemonade has a few markets to go before it comes here. So does Amazon. But you may need every day's grace they give you.

 

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