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nib and Tend digital healthcare partnership, and more daily news

nib has announced it’s partnership with Tend to allow eligible nib members unlimited access to Tend’s GPs through an app. Rob Hennin, nib New Zealand CEO, has said that the partnership will allow members to become more proactive about their health and wellbeing. Hennin said that nib believe that enabling members to easily access GPs. Through this  partnership, nib will help members in taking preventative actions. Hennin has noted that nib advocates for digital healthcare to ensure people overcome barriers and seek medical help.

“Health insurer, nib New Zealand and digital-first healthcare provider, Tend today announced details of a transformational new partnership that will see eligible nib members offered unlimited access to Tend’s GPs through a secure app on their smartphone.

nib New Zealand CEO, Rob Hennin, says the partnership, which is a New Zealand health insurance first, enables nib members to be more proactive about their health and wellbeing by providing an affordable and convenient way to see a GP.

“At nib, we share Tend’s vision of making New Zealanders the healthiest people in the world. To do this, we need to be making it as easy as possible for Kiwis to talk with a doctor wherever they are and whenever they need to,” says Mr Hennin.”

“We also need to be encouraging more New Zealanders to be taking a preventative and proactive approach to their healthcare, and this means thinking differently about how we deliver health services.

“That is why we are huge advocates of digital healthcare because it helps address many of the barriers preventing people from seeking medical advice. Our new partnership with Tend means our members no longer need to take time off work, travel across town and sit in a waiting room when they are sick. Instead, seeing a doctor will be easy.”

Cecilia Robinson, Tend co-CEO has said that Tend is excited about the partnership. The Tend app will allow nib members to have common conditions managed, talk with doctors or nurses and receive e-prescriptions, test results, and laboratory forms on their cell phones. If an in-person consultation is needed, members can make appointments to see doctors in person.

"Tend co-CEO Cecilia Robinson says Tend is excited to be teaming up with a leading health insurer to provide nib members access to a gold standard digital-first primary health service.

“Tend is a ground-breaking healthcare service that delivers GP services through a purpose-built app on your smartphone and is as simple to use as Netflix or Instagram,” says Robinson.

“Like nib, we want to empower Kiwis to take greater control of their healthcare by allowing them to see to a doctor when they want, how they want and where they want, including from the comfort of their home.

“Through the app, eligible nib members will be able to talk with a doctor or nurse as easily as if they are sitting in the room with them. They’ll also be able to receive e-prescriptions, test results or laboratory forms directly to their smartphone.

“Many common medical conditions can be managed through virtual consultations, including minor ailments, various chronic conditions, follow-up consultations and the initiation of laboratory investigations and repeat prescriptions.

“If an in-person consultation is required or desired, patients can simply make an appointment to visit Tend’s state-of-the art clinic for a physical examination.”” 

In other news

AIA: AIA pimps up its Quick Quote calculator

Fidelity Life: Fidelity Life dials up new tech

Aon: Aon reveals new NZ$7.2 billion share repurchase programme

FANZ: How to get the most out of Xero webinar


Legal and regulatory update for the life and health insurance sector

23 Nov 2020 – IRD advised of technical changes to the OECD Common Reporting Standard (CRS) for 2021 relating to the Automatic Exchange of Information (AEOI) for Tax Purposes, which may have an impact on reporting New Zealand financial institutions. CRS reporting for the 31 March 2021 year, due to be filed with Inland Revenue by 30 June 2021, will need to comply with the new standard. https://www.ird.govt.nz/international-tax/exchange-of-information/crs/registration-and-reporting/changes-crs-2021


Welcoming our new staff member

Today we are welcoming Melissa Waddel to the Chatswood team. Melissa is joining us to provide administration support so that experienced members of the team can spend more time with clients and on client projects. If you are a regular client or adviser you may get a call from Melissa who is going to be working on upgrading our adviser and client databases as a portion of her role. 


FMA provides glimpse into full licence, and more daily news

The FMA has provided some insight into the requirements of the full license. It has been revealed that advisers can begin the application process from 15 March 2021. Although the process will be similar to the transitional license, the questions advisers will be required to answer have been described as being more rigorous. Unlike transitional licenses, full licenses will not have expiration dates. John Botica, director of market engagement, has noted that classes and conditions are another difference between the two license types.

“Advisers will be able to start applying for a full license on March 15, 2021, and the FMA says the process will be similar to what advisers have done for their transitional license – however, it says its questioning will also be a lot more rigorous.

According to FMA director of market engagement John Botica, the key differences between transitional and full licensing will be the time period they cover, and the different classes and conditions attached to a full license. He says the FMA will also go into more depth around an adviser’s practices and procedures.

“Transitional licenses last for up to two years, from March 15, 2021, to March 15, 2023, whereas a full license has no fixed term,” Botica explained.”

An important aspect of the full license is that it will include three different license classes. It will be important that advisers choose the right class as they will need to go through the full license application process again if they need to amend their class selection. Botica noted that advisers with transitional licenses will have two years to apply for their full license while new advisers must apply for full licenses. It has also been revealed that questions around competency, to conduct, to conflicts of interest will be examined during the application process.

““You have that license for as long as you continue to run your business. The full process also includes three different license classes, and it’s important to choose the right class – if you need to change it, you’ll need to go through the application process again.”

“There were two standard conditions for transitional licensing, and for the full license, we add another five,” he continued.

“That was subject to consultation, and we had an overwhelmingly positive response from everyone around standard conditions.”

Botica confirmed that there will be a two year period in which advisers can apply for a full license, and the competency safe harbour will last for those two years. However, new advisers will need to go straight to a full license – they won’t be able to obtain a transitional.

Botica says the questions asked by the FMA will also be much deeper, and will touch on everything from competency, to conduct, to conflicts of interest.” Click here to read more

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FMA: FMA notes rise in business impersonation scams during COVID-19

From Goodreturns: Professional indemnity insurance: What advisers need to know

Lifetime: New director appointed to Lifetime board


nib Group deploy new digital claims process, and more daily news

nib has announced the implementation of Melvin, a machine learning engine, that will process claims that are submitted via the app. The adoption of this engine is intended to reduce manual data entry. Brendan Mills, nib Group CEO, has said that after nib enabled photo submission and claims via the app, user experience improved while information processing time increased. 

“Nib has implemented a new machine learning engine to process claims submitted via its app in less time by reducing the amount of manual data entry required behind the scenes. 

 

Five years ago the health insurer introduced a new feature that let members take a photo of their receipt and submit a claim via the app. 

While that improved the customer experience, it became a challenge to process the information at the backend as the volumes of photos increased, said nib's CIO Brendan Mills.

 

“We created a great customer experience but we then also caused ourselves some pain in processing photos because we're then taking a whole heap of flat images and having to rekey all the data [such as] provider number, customer number…it was quite an intensive process,” Mills told iTnews.

nib has said been trialing systems for the past six months. The engine uses AWS Textract to pick up all relevant information from submitted photos. The engine is set to save 20 seconds in handling time per claim, with half not needing further human intervention. nib is looking at expanding the service to process more claims, improve the service, and improve accuracy. 

“For the past six months, the health insurer has been using machine learning algorithms to strip information from the photos and pass it through to the core claims processing system. 

 

The engine, dubbed Melvin, was developed with data science consultancy Eliiza and uses AWS Textract to read the relevant information from the photos. 

 

Mills said the process saves an average of 20 seconds handling time per claim, and about half of the claims require no further human intervention to rekey or adjust any of the fields from the image. 

 

The insurer is now considering how to expand the service to process more claims, improve accuracy levels and determine if claims can be paid out without any human intervention. 

 

Mills said work is underway to determine the types of claims that have a very “high confidence” level to approve automatically, possibly with a post-processing quality assurance mechanism in place.” Click here to read more

In other news:

nib: adult or child signing up to Easy Health, Ulitimate Health Max, or Ulitimate Healththrough nibAPPLY will give them two month free cover. Offer ends 31 January 2021

FMA: FMA seeks consultation on proposed guidance for advertising

SHARE: SHARE confirms Newpark acquisition


nib publish finding from parenting survey, and more daily news

nib has published the findings from its State of the Nation Parenting Survey. The survey looked into the concerns of parents in 2020. Behavioural issues was identified as the top health related concern. This concern was raised by 34% of all participants. While parents with young children reported that their biggest concern was children experiencing extensive episodes of irritability, anger and short-temperedness. Nathan Wallis, nib parenting expert, commented saying that the shift during lockdown added to an already emotional stage for toddlers. When discussing lockdown experiences, participants noted that prolonged negative behaviour were common occurrences.

“Leading health insurer, nib New Zealand, has released the findings from its second annual nib State of the Nation Parenting Survey, shedding light on the concerns that have been top of mind for Kiwi parents during a year unlike any other.

 

Behavioural issues are the number one health concern Kiwi parents have for their children, cited by more than a third (34%) of respondents, up 13% from 2019. Last year’s biggest health-related concern, sleep, still features prominently, as do stress levels and diet and exercise.

 

Taking a closer look at families’ lockdown experience, the number of respondents reporting sustained episodes of negative behaviour from their children (lasting two weeks or longer) grew significantly during the nationwide lockdown period. Concerningly, this increase has been largely sustained since lockdown ended.

 

Parents of younger children reported prolonged episodes of irritability, anger and short-temperedness as their biggest concern, while among parents of high schoolers, the sharpest increase came in levels of concern around changes to children’s motivation.

 

nib parenting expert, Nathan Wallis says, “Lockdown saw most families dealing with added stress as they adapted to new and novel experiences. Toddlers may in many ways have felt this most acutely as they are already in a very emotional stage of development - it’s called “Terrible Twos” for a reason. Toddlers are also just beginning to learn how to manage their emotions, so it’s mum and dad who have to do most of it for them. This was understandably compounded by lockdown, so many parents of toddlers had it quite hard.””

The study also found that parents struggled. Participants reported that their motivation, energy levels, and performance at work decreased during lockdown while feeling overwhelmed increased. Parents reported that their biggest source of stress was financial uncertainty which impacted 39% of participants. The study found that only 8% of participants didn’t feel any stress.  When discussing the future, 70% of participants reported that they felt positive and 67% believed that lockdown helped to solidify their family unit.

“The findings also clearly demonstrate the toll 2020 has taken on parents themselves. Lockdown saw sharp increases in the number of respondents suffering from decreased motivation, decreased energy levels, a sense of feeling overwhelmed, and declining performance at work. Any subsequent reduction since lockdown ended has been limited to just one or two percentage points.

 

The biggest source of stress reported by parents this year was financial uncertainty, impacting 39% of respondents – followed closely by the impact of COVID-19 on the world, general job-related stress and the economy. Fewer than one in 10 respondents (8%) reported not feeling any particular level of stress over this period.

 

For the 42% of respondents who saw their financial situation worsen due to COVID-19, the impact of this was reflected in general stress levels, and also felt in terms of quality of sleep and relationships.

 

Despite an undeniably tough year, it’s not all bad news. When asked about the outlook for their family, 70% of respondents reported feeling positive about the future and 67% believe lockdown strengthened their family unit, with many reporting a greater sense of happiness, and better communication as a result.”

 

Here is a list of the key findings: 

Parents’ biggest health-related concerns for their children:

·       Behavioural issues – 34% (up 13% from last year) 

·       Diet and exercise – 33% 

·       Sleep (lack of, too much, pattern changes) – 31% 

·       Stress levels – 31%

Biggest behavioural concerns, with episodes lasting two weeks or longer (as experienced pre-, during and post-lockdown): 

· Pre-school children – prolonged episodes of irritability, anger and short-temperedness. 

§  12% pre-lockdown, 28% during lockdown, 25% post-lockdown

· Primary and intermediate children – prolonged episodes of irritability, anger and short-temperedness. 

§  17% pre-lockdown, 32% during and 28% post-lockdown

·       High school children – prolonged episodes of decreased motivation. 

§  12% pre-lockdown, 37% during lockdown, 23% post-lockdown

 

Biggest personal impacts of lockdown – experienced by parents themselves: 

·       Decreased motivation – 13% pre lockdown, 29% during lockdown, 28% post-lockdown

·       Decreased energy – 14% pre-lockdown, 29% during lockdown, 30% post-lockdown

·       Feeling overwhelmed – 19% pre-lockdown, 33% during lockdown, 31% post-lockdown 

·       Declining performance at work – 5% pre-lockdown, 14% during lockdown, 13% post-lockdown

 

Parents’ biggest sources of personal stress: 

·       Financial uncertainty - 39% of respondents

·       The impact of COVID-19 on the world - 36%

·       General job-related stress - 34%

·       The economy - 34%

 

Impact of lockdown on family unit: 

·       Greatly strengthened family unit – 24%

·       Somewhat strengthened family unit – 43% 

·       Made no difference to family dynamics / relations – 28%

·       Somewhat weakened family unit – 4%

·       Greatly weakened family unit – 1%

 

Parents’ outlook for the future of their families: 

·       Very positive – 22%

·       Positive – 48% 

·       Neutral – 18%

·       Concerned – 2%

·       Extremely concerned – 2%

·       Don’t know / unsure – 8%

 

In other news: 

AIA: AIA Taking Small Steps campaign won Best Brand Campaign at Interactive Advertising Bureau awards

Southern Cross: Little heart monitor can be sent to patients in the mail, speeding up results

Southern Cross: New findings reveal we put higher pressure on ourselves than others

 


Legal and regulatory update for the life and health insurance sector

18 Nov 2020 – The Privacy Commissioner published a reminder regarding the Model Contract Clauses for “Disclosing personal information outside New Zealand” under new Privacy Principle 12 available on the Commission website at https://privacy.org.nz/news-and-publications/guidance-resources/disclosing-outside-nz/

19 Nov 2020 – As part of Fraud Awareness Week, which runs from 15 to 21 November, the FMA released a media briefing regarding the rise in scams impersonating NZ businesses during COVID-19. https://www.fma.govt.nz/news-and-resources/media-releases/rise-in-scams-during-covid-19/