Number of advisers on FSPR decreases, and more daily news

It has been announced that the Companies Office has deregistered advisers that were registered as financial advisers on the FSPR. Although the number has decreased from the initial number recorded in March 2020, it has increased from the figured reported in March 2021. Currently are there 9236 registered financial advisers. Bolen Ng, MBIE national manager of business registries, has said that 458 FSPs were registered under s18(1)(b) of the Financial Service Providers (Registration and Dispute Resolution) Act 2008. 550 letters were sent out to FSPs who weren’t linked to a FAP. Individuals had 20 working days to update their registration. FAPS now have until 15 March 2023 to apply for their full licences. Click here to read more

“As of July 29, there are 9236 financial service providers (FSPs) registered as financial advisers (FAs) on the Financial Service Providers Register (FSPR).

This number is down 80 from March 15, 2020, but up 58 from March 15, 2121.

FSPs on the FSPR:

- FSPs registered as financial advisers on the FSPR as at 15/03/20: 9316

- FSPs registered as financial advisers on the FSPR as at 15/03/21: 9178

- FSPs registered as financial advisers on the FSPR as at 29/07/21: 9236

Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment national manager of business registries Bolen Ng says the Companies Office has deregistered 458 FSPs under s18(1)(b) of the Financial Service Providers (Registration and Dispute Resolution) Act 2008.

"These are the FSPs that became financial advisers under the new financial advice regime on March 15, but hadn’t linked to a financial advice provider within three months of that date," Ng says.

In June, the Companies Office sent about 550 letters to FSPs who had not linked themselves to a financial service provider (FAP) warning them of imminent deregistration.

FSPs had a 20 working day objection period within which to update their registration.

FAPs now have less than two years to apply for a full licence by the cut off date of March 15, 2023.”

These reductions are not as great as feared by some through the implementation of the new regime. However, it may be too soon to declare that the necessary balance has been struck between raising standards and sustaining access to advice for the greatest number of clients. As the process of gaining a transitional licence did not require passing much of a threshold many advisers that may leave the industry may have entered the new regime with little or no intention of obtaining a full licence. Insurers report levels of new business production have fallen substantially. That suggests that the industry has sustained a serious blow not fully described by these numbers. 

In other news

Financial Advice: KiwiSaver – Contributions are just as important as fees

RBNZ: Reserve Bank considers tighter mortgage lending standards

From Good returns: Income protection: Why taxable losses are not the right advice